Anny’s Grand YouTube Experiment

How many of you watch YouTube videos regularly? Raise your hands.

Hopefully at least a few of you raised your hands!

In my quest to find the main ‘gateway’ to my audience, I’ve decided to double down on YouTube and see what happens. I picked YT because it’s the only platform I know that spans all ages from 8-60 or so. My goal is to create an engaged community made up of my potential readers and connectors.

Kid lit authors are in a unique position because they often can’t interact directly with their readers. (Unfortunately in this day and age an adult author reaching out to a kid on social media is considered creepy no matter what the intention.) Also my young readers can’t buy the books themselves. So I have to reach the connectors first…i.e. educators who can recommend my books, parents who buy the books, and booksellers who sell them. (Of course I hope the adults will enjoy reading my books too, but you can’t plan to have a ‘crossover’ book.)

The downside of YouTube for me, and many others, is that it’s arguably the hardest platform to participate in. Besides the equipment you need to film the vids, the software you need to edit them, and the months/years it takes to become decent at editing, YT can trigger a whole host of insecurities.

For me it’s my round face, the potential glare in my glasses, what should I wear each time, can I keep your attention, what kind of comments will I get, will I get any comments at all.

Emily Graslie, a YouTube champ, who also happens to be the Chief Curiosity Correspondent for the Field Museum in chitown sums this up eloquently in her video entitled: Where My Ladies At?

So why do it? Besides what I said above, to me video it the most intimate and engaging way to reach you, my community. Plus, I’m drawn to try it despite my fears.

In the coming weeks I’m going to be posting my first interviews for my Active Acceptance Project. (More about that later.) I hope you’ll tune in and let me know what you think!

Please spread the word about my project/channel, feel free to suggest other neat ways to expose folks to Active Acceptance, send video ideas, and whatever else you can think of to me by posting a comment below, or tweeting me or posting a comment on my YouTube channel. I can use all the help I can get.  

FYI: Please share this letter with others you think would enjoy it.

#AcceptanceEmpowers

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:
YouTube’s logo if I were in charge!


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Do Books Spark Activism in You? Anny’s first panel…

Sorry I’ve been MIA—been prepping for conferences.

I was lucky enough to be asked to speak on a panel at C2E2, Chicago’s Comic Con, about how to use books to spark activism in our kids, our friends, our community, and ourselves.

‘Twas my first time speaking on a panel as a writer. Nervous I was, especially because the moderator declined to give us any talking points or questions in advance, so we had to wing it. Definitely one of those trial by fire experiences.

It had a happy ending. We had a full house, which is rare for the educational panels at the con, and to my utter surprise one of my comments garnered applause.  A short clip of my answer is up on my YouTube channel.

This was the applause getting comment to the above question: Books provide insight into ‘another.’ They let us travel the world so that we can see into others’ hearts—feel their struggles, their joys. They expose us to their beliefs. Through more understanding, we can practice what I call the platinum rule. Help others the way THEY want to be helped, not the way YOU want to be helped. (Throwing money at certain African nations, instead of empowering them on the ground comes to mind as an example.)

I first learned the inaccuracy of the press when I went to China as a kid, before it was westernized at all. It was a traditional Communist country, and therefore something to fear if you believed our government and their press. We were also something they were told to fear, the white devils of democracy.

We weren’t allowed to travel on our own, but instead were escorted by a Communist guide. Mrs. Yung was generous, kind, warm and took excellent care of us. We were mobbed like rock stars everywhere we went because most Chinese had never seen foreigners, let alone American kids. But it was curiosity, not fear, that met us as we traveled around the country. The language barrier prevented much conversation, but their gestures conveyed warmth and friendliness.

What that trip taught me, and hopefully those who met us, was that people are not their government. They are not the propaganda. We have so much more in common than the powers that be want us to believe.

I returned from that trip wishing I could give American students a scholarship to go to China to see for themselves what I’d seen. I was sure it would lead to more unity between our countries. (I felt the same way 3 years later when I went to the Russia.)

But since I can’t send everyone to China, Russia etc., books are the next best thing.

Here’s a short list of graphic novels that shed light on folks you may not know much about. (Because it was a comic con I focused on the graphic format.)

March
Persepolis
American Born Chinese
TomBoy
Ms. Marvel, Kamala Khan, No Normal, Vol 1
Hereville

This list is just a starting point. I’d love to add to this list.

Please send me book titles that sparked empathy and/or action in yourself or someone you know. You can share by replying to this letter, or posting your titles on my Facebook page, or tweeting me.

FYI: Please share this letter with others you think would enjoy it.

#AcceptanceEmpowers

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:
Cobalt Chinese Foo dogs. (At least cobalt has violet tones in it.)


Posted in Acceptance, Creativity, Empowerment, Self-Acceptance, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

Take Me To Your Leader…Space Aliens and Acceptance

“One day, we might receive a signal from a planet like this,” Hawking says in the documentary, referring to a potentially habitable alien world known as Gliese 832c. “But we should be wary of answering back. Meeting an advanced civilization could be like Native Americans encountering Columbus. That didn’t turn out so well.” From: Stephen Hawking’s Favorite Places, a new documentary streaming now on the CuriosityStream video service.

Why do we assume aliens are evil?

In some ways it’s hard wired into us. As cave people any unknown species or human could spell trouble. The first time a cave person saw a lion he/she probably became the lion’s dinner. So after a while, a lion was an automatic ‘uh oh, where’s the spear?”
 
This likely happened over and over again every time a cave person encountered a new species, or humans outside of their own group. Thus to survive, we learned to fear unknown people, places and things. And that made sense back then.
 
But it hurts us now. Lions and marauders no longer sneak up on most of us in our daily lives.  There are those who live in war zones or pockets of cities where their survival is in danger almost daily, and sadly, their being on high alert is warranted. (Though for many I talk to who live in Israel for ex, they choose to exert limits on their fear. They avoid areas which may be dangerous, but don’t dwell on the possibility that a scud missile could crash into their house any day. Because fear sucks the joy, the life out of life. And if they’re choosing to live there, they may as well make peace with the situation.)
 
But Fear wants to be expressed no matter what. After all it reasons, it has the most important job of all, keeping us alive. And that’s how it hurts us. Fear runs amok, making acceptance difficult if not impossible.
 
It sees danger in every unknown face we encounter. It blocks us from getting to know each other, from seeing the joy, the peace, and the kindness that exists in most of us.

I prefer to view possible aliens like Neil deGrasse Tyson does.

“In our own civilization we know the consequences of a more advanced culture coming upon a less advanced culture. They get enslaved, they get disease-ridden, and they get put in camps or slaughtered. It disturbs me a bit as an astrophysicist to have we humans portray aliens based on how we know we would treat one another.  Rather than on how they might otherwise treat us given our highest and noblest causes. I don’t fear sending out our return address to aliens. Maybe aliens are beyond us in every way, including their capacity to treat one another kindly.”

And I strive to transcend my fear so that my encounters with new humans are bathed in acceptance and kindness rather than fear. (Though I’m batting about 500 at this right now if I’m lucky. )

What tools/skills do you use to be accepting of people you don’t know, or ideas that are different from your own? ( I can always use more tools in my how to be more accepting toolkit!)

Please share your answers by posting your responses in the comments below or on my FB page.

P.S. I now have a private FB group. If you’re not already a member, feel free to join and post your answers there!

FYI: Please share this letter with others you think would enjoy it.

#CreativityEmpowers
#Acceptance Encourages

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:
Maybe the first aliens will come from this planet and have purple skin! Oh I’ll be jealous about the skin!


Posted in Acceptance, Self-Acceptance, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

Hidden Figures, How a Woman’s Creativity Saved NASA

KatherineJohnsonQuote

Hidden Figures is hands down the best movie I saw in 2016!

It’s the story of how one woman’s creativity saved not only a man’s life, but also the entire NASA program itself.

Katherine Johnson was one of a handful of African-American women who worked at NASA in the ‘50s. She referred to herself and her female colleagues as ‘virtual computers who wore skirts.’

Katherine says that she was pulled from the ‘colored computer pool’ to work on flight research because she always asked a lot of questions, while the rest of the women just did as they were told.

But it was Katherine’s creative use of geometry that made the all white male division “[forget] to return me to the pool.”

In 1962 John Glenn was slated to become the first American to orbit the earth. Right before launch, Katherine’s supervisor discovered that the fancy new IBM computer had turned our conflicting return longitudes and latitudes. When he shared this info with Glenn, Glenn refused to go up until Katherine had verified which of the computer’s numbers for launch and landing were correct.

Once in orbit Glenn’s heat shield started to fail.  Again Glenn and a panicked NASA supervisor turned to Katherine. She reassured them that her ‘return window’ numbers would get Glenn safely back to earth.

If Katherine’s geometry had been wrong, Glenn would’ve been incinerated upon re-entry.  In addition, his death would’ve most likely given Congress the reason they needed to stop funding NASA.

Fortunately for Glenn, Katherine’s numbers were spot on as usual.

Once Glenn survived, NASA had its eye on the moon, but had no idea how to get there. Katherine was told that she’d have to invent math that didn’t exist yet in order to make it happen. She did just that.

Lest you think I’ve given the whole movie away, I haven’t.  The story is powerful because it’s really about race, sexism, and the few folks on both sides that decided that they were going to move beyond their prejudices and make history.

So please read the book Hidden Figures, or go see the movie, or both. You’ll come out of it encouraged, empowered and ready to create something of your own. And who knows? Your creation just might be the thing that takes us to Mars, or saves an endangered species in the ocean, or adds beauty to the wall of a museum.
 
Would love to know what you thought of the movie/book. Please let me know by replying to this letter, or post your comments on my Facebook page, or tweet me.

FYI: Please share this letter with others you think would enjoy it.

#CreativityEmpowers

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:
Thank God Katherine is better at math than I am!

purplemath


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Using Our Imaginations to Create Social Change

hpalogo

Creativity Can Encourage and Empower Us All.

The above mantra grew out of my response to recent events.

Truthfully, I’ve known it all along.

I was born wanting to inspire, provoke, and empower myself and others through the arts.

But my family saw a different future for me. They pushed me into politics, wanting me to be the first female President of the U.S. I tried that route for a while, but discovered quickly that I could help a lot more people through my music and writing than I could through policy and politics.

So I hopped on the artistic roller coaster and never looked back. Well, I do look back on occasion when I get a bad review or another rejection, but I never get off the ride.

Though politics didn’t agree with me, my family’s notion that one should support the causes they believe in every way they can, i.e. money or time or both, did resonate. I’ve been volunteering since I was 10 yrs old. In fact I think volunteering is one of my best skills.

Imagine my delight when days after I’d found my mantra I discovered the non-profit Harry Potter Alliance whose values include believing in magic and my personal favorite: Fantasy is not only an escape from our world, but an invitation to go deeper into it.

HPA’s mission is to turn fans into heroes by engaging them in fan activism.  The idea is to harness the passion fans have for certain characters like Neville Longbottom, a shy awkward Harry Potter classmate who became a badass when his back was against a wall, and direct them to fight like Neville for causes such as net neutrality and the electoral college vote. The Neville campaign page gives sample scripts of what to say on the phone to congress humans, where to find phone numbers, and info on the cause etc.

Within a day or two of discovering HPA, I started The Patronuses. The Chicago community chapter of HPA.

FYI: A patronus is an silvery white animal spirit that holds a magical concentration of happiness and hope, which protects against the dementors, those that would suck the happiness and hope right out of you.

We are barely a few weeks old, but already have a mission statement:
The Patronuses fuse the powers of imagination and fan activism together to support and/or create campaigns designed to bring positive change in areas such as diversity, acceptance and education.

I’m overjoyed to finally marry my two loves, imagination and activism, in such a direct way!

We are already discussing our first campaign, which will probably revolve around partnering with Comic Education Outreach to use comics and graphic novels to teach the skill of acceptance perhaps using Ms. Marvel, Kamala Khan, as our role model/fandom base. (Tho HPA grew out of Harry Potter fandom, any fandom is welcome. There are already campaigns using The Hunger Games, some Marvel Cinematic Characters, as well as Potter campaigns.)

As our journey unfolds I’ll continue to fill you in, hoping one or more of our campaigns strikes your fancy and you’ll join us. You can help as much as you want. The key is to have fun and be of service at the same time.

There is no limit to what we can do if we do it together.

To be kept in the loop, please email us at acceptopatronus@gmail.com so we can add you to our Patronuses list. Feel free to include a cause or two you would like to support and/or a character or two that you feel would be a good symbol/role model for a cause. You can also leave your suggestions by replying to this letter, or posting on my Facebook page, or tweet me.

FYI: Please share this letter with others you think would enjoy it.

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:

My very own amethyst wand

annypurplewwand


Posted in Creativity, EmpowerGirlsOfAllAges, Empowerment, Imagination, Thinking Outside The Box by with 2 comments.

There’s Power and $$$ in Numbers

A Slice of AnnyWorld:

Original-9-WTA

Forty-five years ago 9 women were paid $1 to sign on to the renegade Virginia Slims Tennis Tour. (Seven Americans — Rosie Casals, Nancy Richey, Valerie Ziegenfuss, Julie Heldman, Peaches Barkowitz, Kristy Pigeon and Billie Jean KIng. They were joined by two Australians — Kerry Melville Reid and Judy Tegart Dalton.)

The U.S. tennis association threatened to expel them from the sport, possibly ending their careers.  (The two Australians that signed on were told their careers were over.)
What inspired them to put their dream careers on the line?  EQUALITY.

At the time male tennis players could make a living playing professional tennis, but women couldn’t because they were paid significantly less prize money than the men, and not being offered endorsement deals. Part of the reason for this inequality was the prevailing belief that playing sports was unladylike, and therefore girls weren’t supposed to pursue sports as a career.

The Original 9 rejected this idea saying that they wanted any girl born any place in the world, if she was good enough, to have an opportunity to compete, be recognized for her accomplishments and make a living playing professional tennis.”

Because they had the courage of their convictions, our girls not only play sports and get paid for it, but are encouraged to do so.

But one Original 9 didn’t stop at tennis. Billie Jean King founded Women’s Sports Magazine and Women’s Sports Foundation to champion all female athletes in their quest to be recognized and paid for their achievements.

Billie Jean’s extra efforts, combined with her historic win against Bobby Riggs in the Battle of the Sexes, made her the poster girl for the gender equality movement.  So much so, that Life magazine named her one of the 100 Most Important Americans of the 20th Century.  She was the only female athlete on the list, and one of only four athletes total. (Babe Ruth, Jackie Robinson and Muhammad Ali were the others).

Her notoriety netted her endorsements, which paid her lots of money for the time, but the other 8 of the Original 9 didn’t receive the same attention or financial reward. 

Billie Jean wants to correct that.  In a recent piece she wrote for the NY Times she points out that successful tennis players like Serena Williams stand not only on her shoulders, but on the 8 other pairs of shoulders as well.

She points out that until others raised their voices with her, change didn’t happen.  That we girls can move mountains, but only when we come together–risk together, help each other.

Too often we girls turn on each other, be it bullying about our appearances, working moms vs stay-at-home moms, or female bosses being threatened by up and coming underlings.  We forget that we’re stronger as a group, not at each others’ throats.  After all, succeeding together is in our DNA.  A lion could take out one or two of us when we were home in the cave defending our children, but it lost when we all banded together to defeat it.

Never give up, Never surrender, and always have each others’ backs.  That’s how we can Empower Girls Of All Ages!

Are you part of a group that’s changed the world around you in some way? Tell me about it either in reply to this letter, or post it on my author FB page.

PurpleTennis Racquet

Purple Passion of the Fortnight

Destination of the Fortnight: Billie Jean King Tennis Center

Destination of the Fortnight: Billie Jean King Tennis Center

Change the story


Posted in EmpowerGirlsOfAllAges, Empowerment, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

How Can You Use Your Imagination To Make The Rest Of Us Care?

A Slice of AnnyWorld:

Imagine that you’ve decided to become a doctor.  You’re good in school and work hard, but your parents tell you it’ll never happen because they can’t afford the education you need.  One day a strange man shows up and tells your parents that he’ll make you a doctor.  All you have to do is work for a few hours after school on his boat.  You’re terrified to leave your family, but they tell you it’s for your own good.  And you really want to be a doctor!
You wake up your first morning with the man scared, but also excited about your future.  Instead of taking you to school, the man puts you on his boat.  Day after day, you do back breaking work in the sun, wondering when school will start.  It never does.  The man lied to your parents.  He bought you for cheap so you could be his slave. Oh, and you’re only eight years old.

This is not the beginning of my latest novel, but rather a daily occurrence in Ghana.
Surprised?  So was my friend Lori Dillon when an Oprah show profiled the Right To Be Free Organization (RTBF) that both rescues these kids, and prevents more kids from becoming enslaved.

In response, Lori founded the U.S. branch of Right To Be Free, and started to encounter a struggle of her own.  Namely, how do you get the rest of us to care enough to donate to your cause? Especially when there are so many causes that hit closer to home?

For Lori it meant figuring out a way to get the rest of us to walk a mile in a young Ghanian slave’s feet.  (Many of them don’t have shoes.)  To do this, she had to get creative.  First off believing that she had to use “imagery to convey truth,” Lori, along with her fifteen year old daughter, went to Ghana to film a rescue mission.  The film tugs at heartstrings to be sure, but sometimes that isn’t enough to stir action.

Sometimes you need to take a cue from branding land and come up with a clever and catchy campaign.  Thus the 5 For Freedom Campaign was born.
Give $5, tell 5 friends, which these days takes 5 seconds, and that’s it.

But it’s not really it.  Because Lori knows that she has to keep coming up with new, and even more creative ways to keep our hearts and wallets open.

Which leads me to my big question…how have you used your imagination to further a cause you believe in?

And if you’ve any innovative ideas of your own that can help Lori further Right To Be Free, please respond to this email or post them on my Facebook page!

Then sit back and imagine the smile on the face of the next child RTBF saves!

Purple Passion of the Fortnight: Ghanian students whose school had the good taste to make their uniforms purple!

Purple Passion of the Fortnight: Ghanian students whose school had the good taste to make their uniforms purple!

Destination of the Fortnight: Ghana at sunset

Destination of the Fortnight: Ghana at sunset

EinsteinQuote


Posted in Imagination, Inspired Creativity, Thinking Outside The Box by with 1 comment.

I’M BIASED WHEN IT COMES TO PLUTO, LUCKILY NASA ISN’T!

A Slice of AnnyWorld:

When it comes to Pluto I’m biased.  I grew up with Pluto being a planet, and dammit,
I refuse to believe otherwise.

Unfortunately, I also grew up biased against pursing a career in #STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math).  STEM is a boy’s game, I was told.  You shouldn’t bother to play. I assumed girls today were being given a different message.  I was wrong.

In 2012 the National Academy of Sciences published research showing that BOTH female and male faculty rated male applicants as significantly more competent and hireable than the (identical) female applicant. In addition, the boys got higher starting salaries and were offered mentoring opportunities not given to the girls.

What bothers me most about these findings is that the women faculty members were just as prejudiced against their own kind as the men.

It’s time we girls throw off the silly notion that we aren’t as good at science as the guys, and encourage our girls to storm labs all over the country.  How can we expect the boys to accept us if we don’t accept and encourage ourselves?

All we have to do is follow our leader–NASA.

Yes, NASA.  According to NASA, women make up 25% of Pluto’s New Horizon’s team–and many of them are in leadership roles. It’s not equal yet, but it’s the highest number of women on a NASA project in history. (In 2013 the total number of U.S. female astronomers and physicists was only 11.8%)

I’m ecstatic that PLANET PLUTO is finally getting its 15 minutes of fame courtesy of lots of us gals!

However, Pluto’s women don’t focus on their numbers. Rather, they yearn for the day when gender equality in the sciences is no big deal. “Girls will be inspired to be scientists and boys will grow up to be ‘gender blind,’ seeing women in science as the norm,” says Deputy Project Scientist Leslie Young.

I want to honor New Horizon’s women by continuing to encourage girls in AnnyWorld to follow their dreams wherever they lead, including Pluto and beyond. (Madu’s thinking about becoming a NASA scientist or astronaut. She’s also open to designing their spacesuits too.)

How do you respond when your daughter, or niece, or female student etc. talks to you about math or science?

Purple Passion of the Fortnight: Lava lamp rocketship

Purple Passion of the Fortnight: Lava lamp rocketship

Destination of the Fortnight: Pluto

Destination of the Fortnight: Pluto

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Posted in EmpowerGirlsOfAllAges, Thinking Outside The Box by with 4 comments.

WHERE THERE’S A WILL, THERE’S A WAY

A Slice of AnnyWorld:

It all started when Will decided to make his grand entrance exceedingly early–three months before his due date. 

Having not waited until he was fully ‘cooked,’ meant Will had to spend five months in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A harrowing experience for Will, but maybe even more so for his parents, Brittany and Scott. (Around 60% of parents whose babies have long NICU stays  are at risk for Post-Traumatic Stress.) Well-meaning caregivers focused on Will’s survival, but didn’t have time to educate his parents on what was happening, or how to handle a fragile preemie, so often Britt and Scott were left out of their son’s care altogether. 

As the months dragged on, Britt imagined a world where parents were an equal and active member of their baby’s health care team.  She and Scott shared her idea with docs, nurses, caseworkers, parents, everyone involved in the NICU process to see what they’d have to do to turn Britt’s dream into a reality.  What they discovered was that there was a name for what they wanted to bring into the NICU: Family Integrated Care. 

Turns out FICare had been around a while.  A pilot program at Mt. Sinai Hospital in Toronto revealed a simple truth: babies/children not only survived more often, but thrived when health care became a family affair. To make Family Integrated Care a reality in her backyard, the Bay Area , she and Scott founded Will’s Way Foundation.

Right now Will’s Way devotes money and energy to supporting families with babies in the NICU. As Britt put it: “We try to give parents one moment to feel normal.”  Will’s Way accomplishes that by providing “milestone meals” to parents, such as when a baby reaches a goal weight, or gets off oxygen, dinner at a local restaurant to get them out of the hospital, and in one case, threw a wedding dinner for a couple who got married while their baby was still in the NICU.

The foundation also addresses basic needs of NICU parents, such as giving gas cards to lessen the expense of their commutes, grocery cards to help them feed their families, and support for the siblings of the sick babies.

And there’s more on the horizon such as using technology to teach parents what they need to know in order to actively care for their baby in the NICU and beyond.
Currently Will’s Way helps about 6 NICU families per week.

Will’s Way’s mission is to make FICare the norm in the NICU first, and then hopefully the paradigm for all hospital patients.

Want to change your world?  Britt’s advice is to “share your idea with others.  Allow your idea to change and become what it needs to be, then own it and continue to grow it.  There are a lot of ideas out there.  The key is to see it through.”

Using their imaginations and will, Britt and Scott are changing the NICU experience for the parents that have come after them.

“Imagine a world where….” finish the sentence and share your idea, and what you will, or are doing to make that word a reality with all of us on my FB page, or reply to this post.
#EmpowerGirlsOfAllAges

Purple Passion of the Fortnight: A diaper cake.

Purple Passion of the Fortnight: A diaper cake.

Destination of the Fortnight: One of my favorite museums is in Will's backyard, The Exploratorium in San Francisco, CA

Destination of the Fortnight: One of my favorite museums is in Will’s backyard, The Exploratorium in San Francisco, CA

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Posted in Imagination, Inspired Creativity, Thinking Outside The Box, Uncategorized by with 1 comment.

Persistence Pays Off, Literally

A Slice of AnnyWorld:

The Key of Persistence

Did you know that if Stephanie Kwolek had listened to her colleagues, thousands of lives would be lost by now?

That’s because In 1964 her colleagues at DuPont considered the cloudy polymer solution she’d made a failure–telling her to throw it out because it wasn’t the clear solution they expected. But Stephanie refused.  “She explains, “I discovered over the years that I seemed to see things that other people did not see… if things don’t work out I don’t just throw them out, I struggle over them, to try and see if there’s something there.” She said she realized that the uniqueness of the liquid “might be useful,” so she spent “several days urging her colleagues to spin it and test its physical properties.”

Once they did test it, they discovered that her solution was five times stronger than steel by weight.

DuPont named the new material Kevlar.

Kevlar is used as a material in over 200 products, but perhaps what Stephanie was most proud of is it’s use in bulletproof vests.  “I don’t think there’s anything like saving someone’s life to bring you satisfaction and happiness.”

Innovation and creativity require persistence in the face of resistance.

As I struggle to finish the current draft of my middle grade fantasy novel, I’m going to think of Stephanie’s tenacity and push myself to carry on.

How has persistence paid off in your life?  Please share with me on my author page, or comment on this post.

Purple Passion of the Fortnight: A kevlar ski helmet.  (Looked for purple bulletproof vest, but alas there weren't any.)

Purple Passion of the Fortnight: A kevlar ski helmet. (Looked for purple bulletproof vest, but alas there weren’t any.)

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Destination of the Fortnight: Wilmington, Delaware, home of the Dupont Lab where Stephanie discovered Kelvar. (This is Stephanie in the 70’s with her invention.)

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Posted in Gal Empowerment, Imagination, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.